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AN ONLINE AND PRINT PUBLICATION COMMITTED TO SHARING PERSPECTIVES FROM WOMEN AND NON-BINARY PEOPLE OF COLOUR

A still from Chewing Gum when Tracey accidentally takes drugs for the first time, courtesy of Channel 4

It’s a new year, and to talk about drugs may be a bit too close for some of you who are trying to claw back serotonin by any means so that you can function at work. Or perhaps your drug use is a year-round endeavour, chasing CBD in an effort to curb your anxiety?

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So much of the discourse around drugs is either laden with intimidating zeal, scaremongering, or outright prejudice. However drugs are, as we’ve previously discussed, a part of UK culture. From the cocaine that lines our pound notes, the cigarettes you smoke on your lunchtime break, or the tinnies you knock back on the train on the way to a big plan (I’m speaking to you, Diane Abbott).

This year gal-dem is partnering with Global Drug Survey due to the lack of information around drug use among marginalised communities. Building a comprehensive record of how and why the world uses drugs, as well as providing information around harm reduction, Global Drug Survey is looking deeper into trends. Year on year, it paints a worldwide picture of the state of drug use, for example, previously found that it’s becoming quicker to procure a gram of cocaine in London than it is to get a pizza delivery

While research suggests lesbian, gay, and bi people are disproportionately more likely to experience harm from substance use there is very little information around drug use in non-binary and transgender circles. Garnering 100,000s of responses per year, the survey needs more results that are representative of the drug attitudes, dependency, and preferences among the LGBTQI+ community and people of colour. And remember, it’s anonymous so your secret is safe with me.

Let us know more about your relationship with drugs, take part in the Global Drug Survey study here before 5 January

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