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London Fashion Week SS17 show reports part 4

26 Sep 2016

Teatum  Jones – The Open Letter to Scotland 

Teatum Jones always use their platform to give a voice to those who might not yet have one in our society. This year, in conjunction with debuting their first menswear collection, we got to hear the voices of a gender fluid Scotland. 

Before the elegant collection hit the catwalk, we were graced with a short film from the designing duo about how they became obsessed with the Glaswegian LGBT community. The film featured young Scottish designers, artists and musicians telling their stories, setting the tone for what can only be described as an intricately designed collection. 

But, let’s talk about the clothes. The collection was derived from a 20th-century watercolour painting by Scotland’s Charles Rennie Mackintosh’s. This was juxtaposed with the duo’s love for this centuries Scottish house ravers which was definitely accented throughout the collection. It’s safe to say the colour palette was broad, but, somehow it married perfectly. Highlights of the collection would be the beautiful hand painted white jacket, that sent cameras on the front row flashing in a frenzy (these were painted in partnership with contemporary artist Tom Leamon), the men’s extreme turn up trousers (can we make these in women’s sizes too, please and thanks) and finally the sheer woven skirts that were the perfect combination of elegant and sexy. 

We haven’t even got through SS17 yet and I’m waiting for the AW17 Teatum Jones drop. 

Teatum Jones Catwalk Show SS17 LFW

Teatum Jones Catwalk Show SS17 LFW

Teatum Jones Catwalk Show SS17 LFW

Teatum Jones Catwalk Show SS17 LFW

Teatum Jones Catwalk Show SS17 LFW

Teatum Jones Catwalk Show SS17 LFW

Teatum Jones Catwalk Show SS17 LFW

Official photography for the Teatum Jones SS17 Show 

 

Isa Arfen

The body painting and decorations of the Omo Valley Tribes, the elegance and feminity of Seydou Keita’s 1950s and early 1960s portraits of Malian women and finally a dash of Grace Jones in Keith Haring body paint, are all the ideas behind the designer’s SS17 collection.

Set in an east London concrete space, models sat performing mundane tasks in the most exquisite attire. With jazz music playing in the background we overlooked different episodes being performed as the collection developed. The clothing boasted a ready-to-wear luxe feel that designer Serafina Sama is known for. The use of jacquards, silks, linens and cotton gave the collection a lot of texture making the pieces perfect for mixing into your wardrobe. The muted tones gave us a new outlook for the SS17 trends ahead as the catwalks have been dominated by brighter colours. The standout pieces of the collection were simple white linen dress worn by a model with the most wonderful afro and freckles to match, and Keith Haring inspired trousers and dresses.

 

 

Faustine Steinmetz 008

When you think of Faustine, you think of denim. This is a brand that has pushed the limits to a fabric that is in every sense ordinary. 

So when I heard they were revisiting denim again this season I was sceptical. Not of Faustine’s ability to rework the material, but, of my selfish need for brand innovation. But here I stand corrected because Faustine Steinmetz is the denim god who I should have never doubted. 

For collection 008, Faustine focuses on denim on denim. The layering of a material with a self-referential purpose. The tunnel-like presentation took you on a journey of duality from light to dark, showcasing the most ostentatiously designed denim mirrored with overtly-washed and logo monogrammed jackets. Some of the standout pieces were the crystal embellished jeans and the hand woven jackets. 

Nothing is more familiar than blue denim, but Faustine Steinmetz somehow makes you feel like you’re seeing the material for the first time all over again. 

 
 

Tata Naka 

This season Tata Naka took us on a journey to rural Italy. Looking at the resonating elegance of a bygone Capri, Tata Naka takes influences from the signature mosaic work of the Villa St. Michele, as well as marine life and myths. 

The earthy palette of the collection was complimented by the traditional fabrics used – fresh linens, crushed cotton and soft silks paid homage to the historical aspects of the island. Delicate beading and threading could be seen accented throughout the collection. The whole staging was a simple nod to the island jet-set reputation of the 60s – think Jackie O on a boat sipping limoncello. The models sat naturally and comfortable in their settings sporting simple make-up and natural hair giving us an injection of the coastal feel of the island. 

A photo posted by TataNaka (@tatanaka) on

A photo posted by TataNaka (@tatanaka) on

A photo posted by TataNaka (@tatanaka) on

A photo posted by TataNaka (@tatanaka) on

A photo posted by TataNaka (@tatanaka) on